Symposium 6

A Holistic Approach to Sensory and Motor Development from Early Childhood to Early Adulthood   

Long-term development of physical fitness has been a thoroughly researched area. A variety of training methods has been designed to improve fundamental abilities, such as muscle strength, speed, agility, endurance, balance and flexibility. However, less attention has been paid to sensory and cognitive functions within the frame of physical education and sport-specific exercise programs. This symposium highlights a prominent role of sensory-motor processing in developing physical fitness in children and adolescents. The first talk „Global Trends and New Developments in Cognitive-Motor Skills Testing of Children and Youth“ delivered by Prof. Dr. Erika Zemková deals with age-related changes in cognitive-motor skills and their assessment in young athletes and non-athletes. The next study „Effect of Physical Activity for Development of Physical Fitness among School Children in India“ presented by Prof. Dr. Rajesh Kumar emphasizes the importance of physical activity programmes among school-age children for improving their general physical fitness, strengthening bones and muscles, controling the body weight, and reducing the anxiety and depression. The third presentation „Postural Stability in Russian Athletes: the Role of Age, Sex and Sport-related Features“ by Assoc. Prof. Dr. Albina Andreeva summarizes findings of an extensive research focused on identification of the features of postural stability in athletes of different age, sex, performance level, discipline and while using different types of athletic shoes. Finally, the speech by Peter Twist, MSc. on „Developing Physical Literacy Mindfully: The Efficacy of Neural Complexity Brain + Body Exercise Methods to Empower and Educate Students Through the Language of Feel“ provides the audience with an understanding of a holistic system of integrated brain-body muscle-movement methods that permits replicable education of exercise facilitators to guide students using fundamental training principles.

Chairperson and Presenter


Prof. Dr. Erika ZEMKOVÁ
Department of Biological and Medical Sciences
Faculty of Physical Education and Sport
Comenius University in Bratislava
Slovakia

Prof. Dr. Erika Zemková is a professor in the Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Physical Education and Sport, Comenius University in Bratislava. She also works as a researcher at the Technological Institute of Sport, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology. She completed her Masters Degree in Professional Coaching in 1994, and Doctoral Degree in Sports Kinanthropology in 1999. In 2004, Slovak Academy of Sciences awarded her the Scientific Qualification Degree IIa – Independent Scientist. In 2007, she became Associate Professor and in 2013 Full Professor of Sports Kinanthropology. In 2008, she graduated at the Institute of International Relations and Law Approximation, Faculty of Law, Comenius University in Bratislava. She has received fellowships for conducting research at foreign universities, including the Ronald and Eileen Weiser Professional Development Award (University of Michigan, 2009), Fulbright Award (NeuroMuscular Research Center at Boston University, 2005–2006), Aktion Österreich–Slowakei Stipendium (University of Vienna, 2005), NATO Expert Visit Award (University of Aberdeen, 2005), CIMO Fellowship (Research Institute for Olympic Sports in Jyväskylä, 2003), and for teaching activities through the Erasmus Program and bilateral agreements between Universities (2004–2013). She was awarded by Coventry University Research Committee to be a Visiting Professor in Physical Education and Sport at the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University (2012–2015). Her scientific and academic work was noted for merit by her home Faculty of Physical Education and Sport in 2011, 2012 and 2019, and also by Comenius University in Bratislava in 2018.

Global Trends and New Developments in Cognitive-Motor Skills Testing of Children and Youth

The benefical effects of physical activity on performance and health in children and youth are well documented. Recently, exercises aimed at improvement of cognitive functions and academic achievements, such as reading or mathematics, have been increased in popularity globally, yet evidence-based research is scarce. Though experimental studies have supported close association between the exercise and cognitive functioning, the review of research in this field has reported an overall small to moderate effects. This may be partly attributed to measurement limitations. Most physical fitness test batteries (AAHPER Youth Fitness Test, CAHPER Fitness Performance Test, FITNESSGRAM Health-Related Fitness Test, Eurofit Physical Fitness Test, ALPHA Health-Related Fitness Test, International Physical Fitness Test, Chrysler AAU Fitness Test, YMCA Youth Fitness Test, National YPF Program, China’s National Youth Fitness Test Program, Australian Fitness Education Award, New Zealand Fitness Test etc.) are used to assess mainly endurance, speed, agility, muscle strength, balance, and flexibility. However, much less attention is paid to testing of age-related changes in cognitive-motor skills. Majority of cognitive tests are combined with sport-specific movements (e.g., dribbling a ball in basketball or soccer). These computerized cognitive tests used in sporting settings provide practical advantages over conventional laboratory tests. Although designed to improve cognitive functions invariably the exercises incorporate both sensory and motor tasks into the methods used for assessing the outcome. Therefore, it may be premature to suggest that these tests primarily assess cognitive functions. Further relevant cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have yet to be performed to investigate their applications in the school environment.

Presenters

Prof. Dr. Rajesh KUMAR
President, International Federation of Physical Education, Fitness and Sports Science Association
Secretary General, Indian Federation of Computer Science in Sports
Principal, University College of Physical Education
Osmania University
India

Prof. Dr. Rajesh Kumar has obtained his Bachelor degree, Masters degree and doctoral degree in Physical Education from Osmania University, Hyderabad and Diploma in Sports Coaching in Athletics from Sports Authority of India. He is presently working as Head and Principal, Department of Physical Education, Osmania University, Hyderabad, T.S. India. . He is the President, International Federation of Physical Education, Fitness and Sports Science Association and Secretary General, Indian Federation of Computer Science in Sports. He is a International Master Athlete participated in the World Masters Athletics Championships held at Finland 2009 and Asian Masters Athletics Championships held at Thailand 2009, Malaysia 2010, Chinese Taipei 2012, Singapore 2016.Bronze Medalist in 5000 M Run in the Asian Masters Athletics Championships held at Bangalore 2006. He is Indian Athletics Team Coach in the 30th World Universiade held at Napoli, Italy from 2nd to 14th July 2019.He has participated and Present the papers in the International Conferences at London, China, Istanbul, Mauritius, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia Vietnam, Malaysia, Bahrain etc.

Effect of Physical Activity for Development of Physical Fitness among School Children in India

Regular Physical activity is important for all Children’s in Schools. The Objective of the present study is to find out the effect of physical exercises for development of physical fitness among school children in India. It is hypothesized that there will be effect of Physical activity for development of Physical fitness among school children. The sample for the Study consists of 40 School Children of Grade 9th and 10th between the age group of 13 to 15 Years out of 20 children are experimental group and 20 are Control group. Physical activities such as Running, Jumping, Throwing and playing sports and games were given to experimental group apart from regular physical education classes of calisthenics exercises for 8 weeks on alternate days per week and control group were attended general physical education class on alternate but no special training were given to improve the physical fitness. Pre Test and Post Test were conducted in the physical fitness items such as 30 M Run, Standing Broad Jump, Sit Ups, Shuttle Run and 600 M Run. The Results of the Study shows due to the physical activity programme the Schools Students experimental group improved a lot in the Physical fitness in Physical Tests compare to control group. Regular physical activity can help children to improve the Physical fitness, build strong bones and muscles, control weight, and reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression. It is concluded that physical exercises promote Physical fitness among school children. Hence the regular physical activity must be included in the physical education programmes in the Schools. Schools are in a unique position to help students attain the Physical education classes of daily physical activity to promote the physical fitness and good health.

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Albina ANDREEVA
Board of Directors, BRICSCESS
Chief Specialist of the Digital Projects Implementation Service,
FSBI “Federal center for preparation of the sports reserve” Ministry for sport of the Russian Federation
Russia

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Albina Andreeva was Head of laboratory (2011 – 2017) and Lecturer (Assoc. prof.) of chair of physiology of Russian State University of Physical Education, Sport, Youth and Tourism (SCOLIPE). Dr. Andreeva was Researchers in the Laboratory of physiology of muscular activity and physical education, Institute of Development physiology of the Russian Academy of Education (2011  -2012). The results of  her PhD thesis and this work «Type-specific features of movement coordinations of primary school children» are published in the journal «Human Physiology». Dr. Andreeva was physiologist of Department of Sports Biomechanics of Moscow Center of Advanced Sport Technologies (until February 2021). She was the Project Manager of the two projects of this Center: 1) Postural stability of athletes, 2) System of scientific and methodological support in young athletes. The results of this work are published in the journals «Sports» and «Gait and Posture». Dr. Andreeva is a Chief Specialist of the Digital Projects Implementation Service of “Federal center for preparation of the sports reserve” Ministry for sport of the Russian Federation.

Postural Stability in Russian Athletes: the Role of Age, Sex and Sport-related Features

The effects of different factors — such as age, sex, sport-related factors — on postural balance in athletes remain unclear. The main objective of our study was to identify the features of postural stability in athletes of different age, sex, performance level, discipline and using different types of athletic shoes. This study assessed postural stability in athletes (n=936, 6-47 years) in a normal bipedal stance with eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC). Postural stability was evaluated based on center of pressure (COP) sway area (AS) and velocity (VCP), while standing on a stabiloplatform. Children (6-12 years) and teen athletes (13-17 years) showed reduced AS-EO (p<.01) and VCP-EO (р<.01) compared to Control (n=225, 7-30 years). In male and female athletes aged 18+, only VCP-EC was lower versus Control. In females (13-17 and 18+) VCP-EO, EC were lower than in males (p<.05). Only in the Shooting group, athlete’s performance level had an effect on VCP-EO (p=.020). The order of VCP-EO increase in athletes compared to Control was as follows: Shooting (-11.3%, p<.0001) < Football (-10.4%, p<.0001) < Boxing (-8.7%, p<.0001) < Cross-Country Skiing (-7.2%, p<.0001) < Gymnastics (-7.0%, p<.0001) < Running (-6.9%, p<.0001) < Team Games Played with Hands (-6.8%, p<.0001) < Wrestling (-6.3%, p<.0001) < Tennis (-5.5%, p=.0004) < Alpine Skiing (-5.4%, p=.002) < Rowing (-5.0%, p=.194) < Speed Skating (-4.7%, p=.004) < Figure Skating (-3.6%, p=.034) < Control. Practicing any kind of sport was associated with increased postural stability in normal bipedal stance. A long use of rigid athletic shoes with stiff ankle support was associated with reduced posture stability. Postural stability in athletes was mostly influenced by the athlete‘s age, and, to a lesser extent, by their sex, performance level, and athlete shoe features.

Peter TWIST
Sport Scientist
President & CEO
TWIST Performance + Wellness
Canada

Peter Twist, MSc, is a Sport Scientist who introduced a functional training paradigm shift creating exercises integrating strength, balance, movement and core to increase brain activity with full body muscle to improve physical literacy and sport performance. Twist’s applied research and industry authorship contributed over 500 papers, 20 books and manuals, 44 DVDs and 18 professional certifications to the coach, trainer and teacher markets. Twist trained over 700 pro athletes including 11 years in the NHL and partnerships with the China Government to modernize performance training and rehabilitation for Olympic teams. His expert staff have helped develop 2,000 pro and Olympic athletes and 20,000 high school and collegiate athletes. Twist Performance + Wellness facilities service adult and youth clients of all levels with functional exercise, naturopathic medicine, physical therapy and holistic nutrition in an integrated health model. Twist is a Scientific Advisor to the Global Foundation of Community Health, an international research group collaborating on children’s health. Peter was honoured with 2001 NSCA’s President’s Award, 2003 CanFitPro Specialty Presenter of the Year, 2010 IDEA Program Director of the Year, CanFitPro’s 2012 Canadian Presenter of the Year, 2013 IDEA World Fitness Inspiration Award and in 2015, was inducted into the USA Fitness Hall of Fame. Twist recently won China’s Most Inspirational in Fitness Award for efforts leading kids, elite athletes and adults to sustainable health and happiness. Current day Twist writes on the benefits of mindset, nature and movement for all ages and the value of neural complexity to sport excellence.

Developing Physical Literacy Mindfully: The Efficacy of Neural Complexity Brain + Body Exercise Methods to Empower and Educate Students Through the Language of Feel 

Balance movement strength and core work collaboratively in concert with your brain’s software to orchestrate the whole body in motion as it must express within gravity on earth. Our body is the vehicle which carries us through life. When it moves better, our world expands, when it has limitations, so do we. Safe, effective and confident human locomotion for active daily living and sport participation requires balance, movement, strength and core for all actions. Key to success is not just moving but how one moves, mindful of how their body feels during load management – be it their body mass into the ground, an external resistance they carry, catch, pull or push. When the brain must fully focus to organize body strategies, the student is drawn more present in the moment, more connected to their body and appreciative of how it serves them advantageously, better understanding how to utilize it. A holistic system of integrated brain-body muscle-movement methods permits replicable education of exercise facilitators to guide students using fundamental training principles. An exercise road map guides smarter safer movement and into an open architecture process to enjoy creating variations. Whole body integrated brain-centric exercise is both quick to fail and fast to adapt, meaning students will fail-improve-achieve every session and often every set – producing “I can do it” attitudes through skill mastery. Partner gamification adds elements of social connection, cooperation and challenge transferable to life, and, elevates how they feel emotionally in the exercise experience.  Participation scale for sustainable healthy living begins by gaining a positive relationship with exercise and feeling empowered. That is a key for behavior change, holding higher value of being active for life.